Proxim looks to fill 'backhaul' demand for 4G wireless networks

18. Oktober 2010
As users demand faster WiMax and LTE wireless networks and devices, wireless carriers must vastly expand the network infrastructure that carries data from cell towers to central switching offices.

The path from a carrier's tower to its switching location, often called the "backhaul" segment, generally consists of a fat pipe made of fiber optic cable or microwave wireless.

"Backhaul can be the weak link in 4G network rollouts," said Craig Mathias, an analyst at Farpoint Group, in a statement. He said that popular applications like HD-quality streaming video and video surveillance will benefit from faster 4G networks now coming online with WiMax and LTE technologies.

Proxim Wireless is moving to take advantage of the added backhaul demand for 4G by launching a point-to-point microwave backhaul radio product for carriers, large companies, government agencies and others that need the added capacity.

Proxim's new Tsunami GX800 product line, unveiled Monday, is designed to deliver high capacity throughput of 622 MBit/sec over a licensed backhaul channel. Carriers are generally requiring 300 Mbit/sec backhaul for LTE and WiMax, said Robb Henshaw, vice president of marketing at Proxim, in an interview.

The Tsunami GX800 operates in the frequency bands from 6 to 38 GHz and in channel bandwidths from 7 to 56 MHz, Proxim said. An outdoor unit that is affixed to an antenna (not manufactured by Proxim) and an indoor unit that is 1 rack unit high are required on each end of a microwave link.